“Crowdsourcing The Investigation” 6th Annual Technology & Digital Evidence Symposium at Osgoode Hall Toronto 2012

Dec 1, 2012 Osgoode Hall of York University, Toronto
Social Networking Media: Crowd Sourcing the Investigation
Cst. Scott Mills, Corporate Communications, Social Media Officer, Toronto Police Service Steven Johnston, Crown Prosecutor, Special Prosecutions Branch, Alberta Justice
• Social networking as part of the electronic footprint of a criminal case
• Discovery of evidence
• Understanding the digital profile of your witness
• Using essential “old school” investigative techniques

Click here for Google Plus Event:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/events/cnt1q8hug8um08140ato3epfgas

Youtube video of presentation (tech difficulties 1/3 way through)

Full description of the 6th Annual Technology & Digital Evidence Symposium at York University Osgoode Hall, Toronto Ontario Canada Saturday December 1, 2012

2:45pm From Osgoode Hall of York University, Toronto
Social Networking Media: Crowd Sourcing the Investigation
Cst. Scott Mills, Corporate Communications, Social Media Officer, Toronto Police Service
Steven Johnston, Crown Prosecutor, Special Prosecutions Branch, Alberta Justice
• Social networking as part of the electronic footprint of a criminal case
• Discovery of evidence
• Understanding the digital profile of your witness
• Using essential “old school” investigative techniques

Presentation Slides of Steven Johnston & Scott Mills

Complete Agenda of Event
Click here for very interesting blog by the Keynote Speaker Susan Brenner

Susheel Gupta, Vice-Chairperson, and Acting Chairperson and CEO, Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

Investigation and Drafting Issues in Cases Involving Electronic Evidence
Cst. Bruce Hunter, Guelph Police Service, Technological Crimes Unit
Randy Schwartz, Counsel, Ministry of the Attorney General (Ontario), Crown Law Office – Criminal
James Whiting, Counsel, Organized Crime Section, Public Prosecution Service of Canada, Vancouver, B.C.

• Technical challenges in the execution of the electronic search
• Drafting considerations in an Information to Obtain involving computers
• When is more than one Warrant required?
• Tips and techniques in navigating multiple Warrants

Search and Seizure Part 1
The Forensics: Latest Tools and Technology
Daniel Embury, Senior Forensic Hardware Engineer, R&D
Team Leader, Technical Analysis Team, Technological Crime
Branch Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Corey M. Fotheringham, Associate Partner, Forensic &
Dispute Services, Analytic & Forensic Technology, National
Leader – Computer Forensics & eDiscovery Services, Deloitte
Scott K. Fenton, Fenton, Smith Barristers
• Step-by-step review of a typical computer search and seizure
• Segregation of information
• Avoiding over seizure
• How to deal with Part VI Criminal Code Invasion of Privacy issues; cloud information, Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty “MLAT” and Production Orders
• Emerging technologies and investigative techniques

Search and Seizure Part 2
The Law: Latest Cases and Hot Button Issues
Scott C. Hutchison, Stockwoods LLP
Steven Johnston, Crown Prosecutor, Special Prosecutions Branch, Alberta Justice
Susan Magotiaux, Counsel, Ministry of the Attorney General (Ontario), Crown Law Office – Criminal
Joseph Di Luca, Di Luca Copeland LLP Barristers

Keynote Address
“Implications of Transnational Computer Searches”
Susan W. Brenner, NCR Distinguished Professor of Law& Technology, University of Dayton School of Law, Dayton, Ohio

Disclosure
The Hon. Justice Joseph F. Kenkel, Ontario Court of Justice
Robert W. Hubbard, Counsel, Ministry of the Attorney General (Ontario), Crown Law Office — Criminal
Michael Lacy, Lacy Wilkinson LLP
• Making sure disclosure is meaningful
• How electronic disclosure is currently handled and how can it be improved?
• How does defence counsel deal with large-sized disclosure packages?
• A practical guide to presenting the evidence in Court and avoiding pitfalls

Blurred Boundaries, Collapsed Contexts: The Ethical Challenges of Social Media
Dr. Avner Levin, Director, Privacy & Cyber Crime Institute Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

• New technologies and the challenges they pose
• Privacy and ethics online
• Ethical principles of social media use
• Applying principles to practice:
– the legal profession
– the employer
– people in authority
• Suggested guidelines for employers and staff

Roundtable Discussion: New and Proposed Federal Government Crime Legislation
Moderators
Susheel Gupta, Vice-Chairperson, and Acting Chairperson and CEO, Canadian Human Rights Tribunal
Steven Johnston, Crown Prosecutor, Special Prosecutions Branch, Alberta Justice
Panellists
Daniel A. MacRury, Q.C., Chief Crown Attorney (Cape Breton Region), Public Prosecution Service of Nova Scotia
Karen Audcent, Senior Counsel, Justice Canada, Criminal Law Policy Section
Frank Addario, Addario Law Group
These speakers of undoubtedly divergent views will discuss and debate the latest crime bills relating to the use of technology.

WhosARat.com is an Interesting website that was on the radar of the legal mind at this conference. Websites like this essentially ‘crowdsource’ an informant, which has the potential to put people’s safety in jeoprody.

WhosARat.com is a website that is on the minds of legal professionals worldwide. Let’s take the discussion forward for success & safety

“Roping Off The Digital Crime Scene” is essential for police work in 2012 and the future stated Crime Stoppers International Social Media Adviser Scott Mills at the 6th Annual Technology & Digital Evidence Symposium At Osgoode Hall, Toronto December 2, 2012. The example of The 2012 Eaton Centre, Toronto Canada Shooting incident was shown to the audience, with over 66,000 tweets plus other online posts sourced on a public event crowd sourcing website called Epilogger, a service founded by Michael Nus and Chris Brooker. Mission of Epilogger is to be the central interactive community for events, ideas and movements. The challenge for police is to be able to capture this potential evidence in a timely manner, sort it, and action the important items as part of the ongoing investigation. This creates additional work for the investigators that requires additional human resources and training. To neglect this aspect of the investigation could result in key evidence being overlooked that potentially could solve a case. The advent of “Crowd Sourcing” capability can also lead police to information that causes police patrol resource allocation to prevent a potential incidence of violence. Question going forward to ponder is Do police use sites like Epilogger for evidence gathering? Do police make their own? Who staffs it? Who pays for the additional costs? How do you separate what is important and what is not? How do you measure effectiveness? The time is long overdue to have the dialogue and work towards solutions.

“Roping Off The Digital Crime Scene” is essential for police work in 2012 and the future stated Crime Stoppers International Social Media Adviser Scott Mills at the 6th Annual Technology & Digital Evidence Symposium At Osgoode Hall, Toronto December 2, 2012. The example of The 2012 Eaton Centre Shooting incident was shown to the audience, with over 66,000 tweets plus other online posts sourced on a public event crowd sourcing website called Epilogger, a service founded by @MichaelNus and @Cbrooker. Mission of Epilogger is to be the central interactive community for events, ideas and movements. The challenge for police is to be able to capture this potential evidence in a timely manner, sort it, and action the important items as part of the ongoing investigation. This creates additional work for the investigators that requires additional human resources and training. To neglect this aspect of the investigation could result in key evidence being overlooked that potentially could solve a case. The advent of “Crowd Sourcing” capability can also lead police to information that causes police patrol resource allocation to prevent a potential incidence of violence. Question going forward to ponder is Do police use sites like Epilogger for evidence gathering? Do police make their own? Who staffs it? Who pays for the additional costs? How do you separate what is important and what is not? How do you measure effectiveness? The time is long overdue to have the dialogue and work towards solutions.
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